Gallery

  • 	A piece of the Association’s pulley system made of lignum vitae, the wood of life. This wood is found only in South America and Africa, and secretes an oily sap even after it is cut down. This makes it indispensable at sea, as the water will not damage it.
  • A wing-nut from the Association. Wing-nuts were used to tighten bolts aboard the ship
  • Coins representing the monarchs Shovell served under. Clockwise from the top: Queen Anne’s Vigo coin, minted from the silver brought to England by Shovell after defeating the Spanish; William III; Charles  II’s Maundy Thursday coin, given to poor person whose feet King Charles washed at Westminster Abbey on Maundy Thursday as a sign of piety; James II’s gun money, a coin minted from melted-down Irish churchbells, given to a soldier as an I-Owe-You until James won the war against William III and regained the crown.
  • Coins and rubble found at the site of the Association.
  • Divers Terry Hiron and Richard Larn with a portion of the fleet’s pieces-of-eight
  • Terry Hiron and Richard Larn amongst the wreckage.
  • A canon found among the wreckage of the Association. The inscription on the canon means “One Master Thomas Pit is commissioned by to make ____ in the year 1604.”
  • A different view of the same canon.
  • Pieces-of-eight encased in coral. Once the treasure chests rotted away, tiny sea creatures began to grow on the coins, forming a coral around them. The coins covered in the coral were protected from the sea, and remained in near-perfect condition. Those outside of the coral were worn away by the sea.
  • Another canon from the Association.
  • Brass buckles from a sailor’s clothing. Jackets and trousers were fastened with buckles like these. It is rare to see one with the centre pin still intact.
  • The personal seal of Edmund Mortimer. This seal would have been used by Mortimer to seal letters and personal documents aboard the ship. Seals were worn pinned to the collar to identify a sailor.
  • Underwater Exploration of the Association
  • Brass nails which held a treasure chest together aboard the ship. These treasure chests were holding thousands of pounds in pieces-of-eight, international currency. The wood rotted away, but the nails remained intact.
  • A brass coak, used to hold pieces of the pulley system together. This is marked with a small arrow, the symbol of the kingdom. All military equipment was marked with an arrow to assure its return to the crown
  • Bullets from the guns of the soldiers on board the Association returning to England from wars with France. The smaller bullets come from pistols, the larger from muskets. The small cup was used to measure powder into one’s pistol.
  • An Aquitaine ring, or personal sundial, owned by a sailor on the ship. By holding the ring up to the sunlight, and adjusting the outside dial to the correct month, light would shine through a small hole to illuminate the hour. This method of timekeeping was not very accurate, but good enough for the average sailor.
  • Bullets from the guns of the soldiers on board the Association returning to England from wars with France. The smaller bullets come from pistols, the larger from muskets. The small cup was used to measure powder into one’s pistol.
  • One of the pieces-of-eight recovered from the wreck. This one comes from the Spanish mine of Potosi in Bolivia. A piece-of-eight could be used as currency anywhere in the world.
  • One of the pieces-of-eight recovered from the wreck. This one comes from the Spanish mine of Potosi in Bolivia. A piece-of-eight could be used as currency anywhere in the world.
  • The brass edging from an officer’s Bible. Only officers aboard ships were educated enough to read, and their Bibles often were adorned with brass buckles and decoration
  • Young Cloudesley Shovel Swimming with Dispatches by W.H. Overend, CTA Magazine